stalking awareness month

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Press Release
January 29, 2013
Contact:  Jennifer Gray
405-694-5523

National Stalking Awareness Month

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma -

Note:  As January wraps up – we wanted to make this information available to you – with the hope that you will pass this on to others.

President Obama, earlier this month declared January National Stalking Awareness Month in 2013. He stated, “I call upon all Americans to recognize the signs of stalking, acknowledge stalking as a serious crime, and urge those impacted not to be afraid to speak out or ask for help. Let us also resolve to support victims and survivors, and to create communities that are secure and supportive for all Americans.”

January is National Stalking Awareness Month, a time to focus on a crime that affects 3.4 million victims a year.  This year’s theme is “Stalking: Know It. Name It. Stop It.” We challenge the nation to fight this dangerous crime by learning more about it.  More info: http://stalkingawarenessmonth.org

What is stalking?  While legal definitions of stalking vary from one jurisdiction to another, a good working definition of stalking is a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to feel fear.

Stalking is a crime in all 50 states and the District of Columbia, yet many victims and criminal justice professionals underestimate its seriousness and impact. In one of five cases, stalkers use weapons to harm or threaten victims, and stalking is one of the significant risk factors for femicide (homicide of women) in abusive relationships.  Victims suffer anxiety, social dysfunction, and severe depression at much higher rates than the general population, and many lose time from work or have to move as a result of their victimization.

Stalking is difficult to recognize, investigate, and prosecute. Unlike other crimes, stalking is not a single, easily identifiable crime but a series of acts, a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause that person fear. Stalking may take many forms, such as assaults, threats, vandalism, burglary, or animal abuse, as well as unwanted cards, calls, gifts, or visits. One in four victims reports that the stalker uses technology, such as computers, global positioning system devices, or hidden cameras, to track the victim’s daily activities.5 Stalkers fit no standard psychological profile, and many stalkers follow their victims from one jurisdiction to another, making it difficult for authorities to investigate and prosecute their crimes.

Stalking Fact Sheet:

http://www.victimsofcrime.org/docs/src/stalking-fact-sheet_english.pdf?sfvrsn=4

Communities that understand stalking, however, can support victims and combat the crime. “If more people learn to recognize stalking,” said Jennifer Gray, Director of ‘Designing a Safer Woman Project’ at runhers women’s association, “we have a better chance to protect victims and prevent tragedies.  As part of our project, this certainly needs to be part of our awareness campaign” Jennifer adds, “We will be doing a host of live forums on this topic, women’s situational safety and other related women’s safety issues.  We are designing live performances, video shorts and information briefs as part of the project.” 

For additional resources to help promote National Stalking Awareness Month, please visit
http://stalkingawarenessmonth.org and www.ovw.usdoj.gov

About runhers® women’s association

runhers is a dynamic and creative women’s lifestyle association.  runhers is built on the belief that women must move to live a healthy, balanced lifestyle.  We produce lifestyle programs, trainings, creative forums and entertainment via amazing events. If you can imagine a better you, we can help you create it.  To engage more, please visit us at www.runhers.com or Facebook.com/runhers and via Twitter @runhers – email info@runhers.com

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