Archive for health

It’s not how fast you know; it’s how well you know fast.

how well you know

by: runhers women’s association

“It’s not how fast you know; it’s how well you know fast.”  Let’s break that statement down. Fast learning is good, as long as you are drilling straight into the facts. Or getting to the heart of the matter quickly with good information. You don’t need more info. You need the right info, at the right time.

Reading a headline, or seeing an image on the television, in the paper, or on social media, doesn’t automatically mean it is true. So, you may ‘know’ something, but it may not be actually or even partially true –  or it could be a twisted opinion of something. And in many cases, it’s a flat out lie. Often times it is a clickbait type attention grabbing headline designed to get an advertisement (or three) in front of you. Willful ignorance is the not the way out, especially when setting examples to kids, or others you may have influence with.

Speaking of influence, many experts, leaders and celebrities are not educating you – they are being paid to sell you specific products. In fact, most sports stars and celebrities are endorsing unhealthy food and drinks.  Even our ‘peers’ are now selling out to companies who will provide them a few dollars of free product – in exchange for endorsements, which the company writes, on their social media feed. The more ‘likes’ (analytics) you can generate, the better. And marketers believe that peer to peer selling is the most effective way to move product right now.  So, be careful what you allow yourself to know fast – and don’t fall for all the ‘10 things you are doing wrong’ links. You’re NOT doing everything wrong!

If you are interesting in knowing more on the social media ‘influence factor’ – this is a good start. “Being A Social Media ‘Influencer’ Is Officially Meaningless.” http://www.vocativ.com/332174/social-media-influencers-lol/

On the opposite side, how ‘well’ you know fast, is a more robust view and understanding of what you are reading or seeing.  At IBM, Tom Watson had one word posted around the campus – think. Steve Jobs said at Apple that we have to make the details unforgettable, even intuitive. They knew, along with many other talented thinkers, that it is well worth the extra step, staying with a problem a little longer, to get through the clutter and find clarity. They actually did question almost everything.

Others insulting our intelligence is not the answer. Yet, every day we are bombarded with words, statements, and advertisements that do insult our intelligence. Our bullshit radar is on high alert almost full time these days. Or we have been habituated to filter and ignore, or accept the noise. So, science is faked (pseudoscience), health claims are unsubstantiated, research and studies are completely biased, or the number of participants in a ‘study’ is very low (non-conclusive) – and on and on.

So, how do you find clarity and truth in all of this? It’s not always easy. Of course there are things you don’t know, or are doing wrong. That’s the case with all of us. We can all do better. As women, when the hair stands up on the back of our necks in a social situation, we know something/someone is just not right. It’s sensory, and very real. You call bullshit, or leave that environment. It’s nearly the same thing with continued learning, whether it’s personal – or you are learning to help your family. Both are very important.

One way to getting to the root of an issue is using Sakichi Toyoda’s “5 Whys” technique – a simple but powerful tool for quickly uncovering the root of a problem, so that you can deal with it once and for all. Ask why 5 times on the matter at hand.  It can produce amazing results.

So, open your mind, and trust your instincts! Be your own best advocate, and that will take you a long way. And by the way, science says you think better when you have a run, or a walk – which only cost you a little time!  Not to mention all the other good feels!

“Hey Clickbait, there’s something wrong with you.”

“Hey Clickbait, there’s something wrong with you.”
~ internet of things

From viewing today’s twitter feed:
@wrongwrong – You’re doing abs all wrong (running, exercising, eating, etc)
@wrongfood – Forget everything you know about food.
@wrongway – Why you are not getting the belly you want – 6 weeks to a flat belly!
@wrongsecret – Secret yoga poses to lean you out.
@secretscience – 6 foods for 6-pack abs
@buymyshit – Try this at night, you’ll wake up gorgeous.
@glamsquadtricks – Celebrity secrets to the beach body you want.

Scroll down the timeline. Click on the link. Read. Click on another super sounding link. Read. It’s a different sensational headline about how I am not doing this or that right, how I should change, be better, be like this, and be like that. What you are really telling me is I’m broken – and I need your help. I need your product, your fix, to be all that I should be. I’m not good enough. I better click and see what I’m missing. Yes, I am somewhat insecure, and self-conscious about what I see in the mirror. I don’t look like any of the women in the magazines or the advertising. If only I try this or that …

STOP. What the hell is going on? Smart advertising, neuro marketing, that’s what. Slick images that are photo-shopped, or even completely computer generated. Teaser phrasing – and wording to pique your curiosity. Professional athletes, or fitness models/competitors that spend hours every day in the gym. Don’t think for a minute these advertisers haven’t done their research, and know you are scrolling through the social media feeds until some headline captures your attention, or hits home (my hips) a certain way. Wait, I can re-shape my hips with one easy to use product? Before and after pics don’t ever lie … right?
It’s called Clickbait. And it’s effective. Let’s explore.

Clickbait is a pejorative term describing web content that is aimed at generating online advertising revenue, especially at the expense of quality or accuracy, relying on sensationalist headlines to attract click-throughs and to encourage forwarding of the material over online social networks. Clickbait headlines typically aim to exploit the “curiosity gap”, providing just enough information to make the reader curious, but not enough to satisfy their curiosity without clicking through to the linked content.
The key words here, quality and accuracy. Sounds like we digressed to the current state of politics, right? Well, the 80/20 rule applies here. 80% of what you’re clicking through on these sensational headlines doesn’t hold up to scientific scrutiny. Simply put, its bullshit, designed to get you on the path of a purchase somewhere down the road. If you re-tweet or ‘like” – it’s more likely for your friends to think you’ve researched or checked this out already, so a peer endorsement is way better than an advertiser’s claim. That’s where the socially influencing systems are at work, spreading junk science to the masses, many times without the re-poster even being aware that the claim is false. We want easy, we yearn for shortcuts – this is the society we live in.

The truth is … there is truth, and there is bullshit. The old saying, ‘if it sounds too good to be true’ has stood the test of time. You are worth more – take the time to do your own research on the facts before you try, or buy. Be your own best advocate. Question everything. There’s no one size fits all. You’re not doing everything wrong. You are doing many things right – reward yourself for that. At the end of the day, it really is all about those small daily smart decisions that add up over time, to significant change. You are not clickbait, you are smarter than that. Stay curious. Adapt good things into your world as you find them. Designing your life, your way, takes time. Have fun with the process!

belly laughs

Echoes of Happiness

Via: Daily OM – by Madisyn Taylor

As children, we laugh hundreds of times each day, delighted by the newness of living. When we reach adulthood, however, we tend to not allow ourselves to let go in a good belly laugh. Inviting laughter back into our lives is simply a matter of making the conscious decision to laugh. Though most of us are incited to laugh only when exposed to humor or the unexpected, each of us is capable of laughing at will. A laugh that comes from the belly carries with it the same positive effects whether prompted by a funny joke or consciously willed into existence. When our laughter comes from the core of our being, it permeates every cell in our physical selves, beginning in the center and radiating outward, until we are not merely belly laughing but rather body laughing.

Laughter has been a part of the human mode of expression since before evolution granted us the art of speech. Through it, we connected with allies while demonstrating our connection with people we didn’t know. In the present, laughter allows us to enjoy positive shared experiences with strangers and loved ones alike. Yet solitary laughter carries with it its own slew of benefits. An energetic and enthusiastic bout of whole-body laughter exercises the muscles, the lungs, and the mind in equal measure, leaving us feeling relaxed and content. When we laugh heartily at life’s ridiculousness instead of responding irritably, our focus shifts.  Anger, stress, guilt, and sadness no longer wield any influence over us, and we are empowered to make light of what we originally feared. Laughter also opens our hearts, letting love and light in, changing our perspective, and enabling us to fix our attention on what is positive in our lives.

It is easy to laugh when we feel good, but it is when the world appears dim that we most need laughter in our lives. Our laughter then resonates through our hearts, filling the empty spaces with pure, unadulterated joy. We regain our footing in the moment and remember that no sorrow is powerful enough to rob us of our inborn happiness. When we understand that uninhibited laughter is the food of the soul, nourishing us from within, we know instinctively that life is worthwhile.

let’s go girl!

runhers is official training partner for the 2015 OKC Go Girl Run

We are happy to announce we are partnering with Ultramax Sports to be the Official Training Group for the 2015 Go Girl Run slated for March 22nd, 2015.  The event start and finish area is set at the spectacular OKC Myriad Gardens.  The race is a women’s only half marathon and 5K.  We are providing both half marathon and 5K training for free in OKC and Norman groups.  We have a $10 off registration discount code (runhers10) – and you can register at: http://ultramaxsports.com/gogirlrun//oklahomacity/home.html

Our 12 week training plan kicks off this Monday, December 29th and the first group run will be Saturday, January 3rd. We will be updating on Facebook pages, Twitter feed (@runhers) and via Constant Contact e-mail if you opt in.  We will provide location, time and any other training tips for the week. 

This training group is for all ages and abilities, and we gladly welcome new walkers and runners! Each Saturday, we will map a safe training route, provide water along the route, and at the start/finish.  We will also teach some warm ups, running drills, etc. and  have some other mini clinics along the way.  Mostly though, we want you to have fun!  Yes, we’ll work – but we’re all in this together, and we want to help you any way we can to achieve your goal.  Oh, and one last thing … what’s said on the run, stays on the run!  ; )

Some of the highlights are below:

Go Girl Run OKC Event Highlights:

  • All Half Marathon participants will receive a New Balance women’s cut technical t-shirt.
  • 5K participants will receive a women’s cut cotton t-shirt.
    • **All 5K participants will have the option to upgrade to the New Balance Technical Shirt for $10 when they register.
  • Boutique Expo with women-specific vendors.
  • New 5K Couples Competition – Grab your significant other and race together!
  • Ultramax Sports Pace Teams
  • Go Girl On-Demand apparel available at Packet Pickup and on Race Day.
  • Custom Go-Girl Finisher Medals for both the Half and the 5K!
  • Custom-etched wine glasses for all finishers.
  • Champagne served at the finish line.
  • Extended finish time limit for walkers.
  • Overall & Age Group Awards – We go four-deep in every age group!
  • Live Results Station
  • Free Race Photos
  • USATF Sanctioned Race

feeling stressed?

Editor’s Note:  Below is a great article from the National Institute of Health (NIH).  Trying to balance everything in today’s world brings many stressors along for the ride. Of course, some stress is actually good for us. As Daniela Kaufer, associate professor of integrative biology at the UC, Berkeley states, “Some amounts of stress are good to push you just to the level of optimal alertness, behavioral and cognitive performance.” However, chronic stress has serious consequences- especially if we don’t develop ways to cope effectively.  The one thing we think is important that isn’t addressed in the article is laughter.  Finding ways to laugh is crazy good for your health!  So, yuk it up as early and often as possible, you’ll be happy you did.  Read on:

 

Stress Relief Might Help Your Health

Winter holidays—do they fill you with joy or with worries about gift-giving and family gatherings? Do summer vacations leave you relaxed or fretful over travel and money? If you’re feeling stressed out over supposedly fun things, it might be time to reassess. Take a few moments to learn how stress affects your health and what you can do about it.

Everyone feels stressed from time to time. Stress can give you a rush of energy when it’s needed most—for instance, competing in sports, working on an important project, or facing a dangerous situation. The hormones and other chemicals released when under stress prepare you for action. You breathe faster, your heartbeat quickens, blood sugar rises to give you energy, and your brain uses more oxygen as it shifts into high alert.

But if stress lasts a long time—a condition known as chronic stress—those “high-alert” changes become harmful rather than helpful. “Stress clearly promotes higher levels of inflammation, which is thought to contribute to many diseases of aging. Inflammation has been linked to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, arthritis, frailty, and functional decline,” says Dr. Janice Kiecolt-Glaser, a leading stress researcher at Ohio State University. She and other researchers have found that stress affects the body’s immune system, which then weakens your response to vaccines and impairs wound healing.

Research has linked chronic stress to digestive disorders, urinary problems, headaches, sleep difficulties, depression, and anxiety.

“Some studies have found the physical, emotional, and social effects of a disease like cancer to be stressful for patients, caregivers, and long-term cancer survivors,” says NIH’s Dr. Paige Green McDonald, an expert on stress and cancer biology. “However, there’s no definitive evidence that stress causes cancer or is associated with how long one survives after a cancer diagnosis.”

The top causes of stress in the U.S. are money and work-related pressures, according to a 2013 survey from the American Psychological Association. Stress can also arise from major life changes, such as the death of a loved one, divorce, illness, or losing a job. Traumatic stress is brought on by an extreme event such as a major accident, exposure to violence, or a natural disaster such as a hurricane or flood.

Caring for a person with severe illness—such as dementia or cancer—can also be a significant source of stress. More than a decade ago, studies by Kiecolt-Glaser and others showed that the stressful demands placed on caregivers can lead to poorer health, lower responses to vaccines, increased inflammation, and a more than 60% higher death rate compared to non-caregivers.

It’s not clear why some people can sidestep or recover more quickly from stress than others. These resilient people seem to “bounce back” more easily after stressful situations. Recent studies of animals suggest that resiliency may depend at least in part on our genes. But learning healthy ways to cope with stress can also boost your resilience.

“There are many different ways to cope with stress. We know from a lot of different studies that having close personal relationships—people with whom you can talk, with whom you can share your feelings—can be helpful,” says Kiecolt-Glaser. “So spending time with family and friends in order to maintain those relationships is perhaps one of the most crucial things you can do as a stress reducer.”

Unfortunately, Kiecolt-Glaser adds, “when we’re stressed, we tend to do the worst things that are not at all helpful to our health.”

For instance, stressed out people may tend to isolate themselves and not seek social support. “Exercise is a great stress reducer. But when people are stressed, exercise becomes less common and less appealing,” Kiecolt-Glaser says. “Instead of maintaining a healthy diet—also important to reducing stress—some people who are stressed tend to eat more donuts than vegetables.”

You may think that the agitation brought on by stress might help to burn calories. But evidence hints that the opposite is more likely. Kiecolt-Glaser and colleagues found that, compared to nonstressed people, those who were stressed burned fewer calories after high-fat meals and they produced more of the hormone insulin, which enhances fat storage. “So stress may contribute to weight gain and obesity through these biological routes,” Kiecolt-Glaser adds.

Getting enough sleep is also key to resilience and stress relief—although stress itself can interfere with sleep. To improve your sleep habits, go to bed the same time each night and get up the same time each morning, and limit the use of light-emitting electronics like computers and smartphones before bed. The light can reduce production of a natural sleep hormone called melatonin, which then makes it hard to fall asleep.

Beyond recommendations for exercise, healthy diet, social contacts, and getting enough sleep, Green McDonald says, “studies have also shown that mindfulness (focused attention on one’s own emotions) and other meditative practices can effectively relieve stress.”

“Mindfulness means staying aware and conscious of your experiences. No matter what we’re doing, we can always make time to bring our attention to our breath and body and stay there for a short period of time,” says NIH psychologist Dr. Rezvan Ameli, who specializes in mindfulness practice. “Recent studies show that even short periods of mindful attention can have a positive impact on health and well-being.”

Other NIH-funded studies have shown that mindfulness meditation can reduce stress, alter brain structure and function, and have a positive effect on the immune system.

“Mindfulness is a simple and effective tool that anybody can use to reduce stress,” Ameli says. Although the concept is simple, becoming more mindful requires commitment and practice. You can learn more about mindfulness meditation from local resources like yoga or meditation classes, mindfulness-based stress-reduction programs, or books.

If you feel overwhelmed by stress, talk with a health care provider or mental health professional. Medications or other therapies might help you cope. In the long run, reducing stress may help you to slow down and enjoy your time with the people and activities you really care about.

Tips To Reduce Stress

  • Get enough sleep.
  • Exercise regularly. Just 30 minutes a day of walking can boost mood and reduce stress.
  • Build a social support network.
  • Set priorities. Decide what must get done and what can wait. Say no to new tasks if they are putting you into overload.
  • Think positive. Note what you’ve accomplished at the end of the day, not what you’ve failed to do.
  • Try relaxation methods. Mindfulness, meditation, yoga, or tai chi may help.
  • Seek help. Talk to a mental health professional if you feel unable to cope, have suicidal thoughts, or use drugs or alcohol to cope.

References:

Daily Stressors, Past Depression, and Metabolic Responses to High-Fat Meals: A Novel Path to Obesity. Kiecolt-Glaser JK, Habash DL, Fagundes CP, Andridge R, et al. Biol Psychiatry. 2014 Jul 9. pii: S0006-3223(14)00385-0. doi: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2014.05.018. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 25034950.

Alterations in brain and immune function produced by mindfulness meditation. Davidson RJ, Kabat-Zinn J, Schumacher J, Rosenkranz M, et al. Psychosom Med. 2003 Jul-Aug;65(4):564-70. PMID: 12883106.

NIH News in Health, December 2014

domestic abuse/unhealthy relationship/dating violence


Editor’s Note:
Our Designing a Safer Woman Guide is built to cover many issues relating to women’s safety. And it does cover some basics on domestic abuse and unhealthy relationships. This section is especially timely given all the attention in the media these past weeks on domestic abuse. We must continue to raise the bar, and the awareness on this issue that affects so many women. Violence against women is serious, even deadly. We must do all we can to support each other and find solutions within our communities. If you are part of an organization that deals with these issues, and have tips and/or resources you’d like to share, please contact us: info@runhers.com

One in every four women will experience domestic violence in her lifetime. Domestic violence is the willful intimidation, physical assault, battery, sexual assault, and/or other abusive behavior perpetrated by an intimate partner against another. It is an epidemic affecting individuals in every community, regardless of age, economic status, race, religion, nationality or educational background.

Violence against women is often accompanied by emotionally abusive and controlling behavior, and thus is part of a systematic pattern of dominance and control. What might have begun as an intense show of affection can quickly turn ugly if boundaries are intentionally crossed and you see the signs of abuse listed below.

BEHAVIORS THAT MAY INDICATE A PROBLEM

  •        Checking your cell phone or email without your permission
  •        Constantly putting you down and making unflattering comments
  •        The presence of extreme jealousy and insecurity
  •        Anger control issues and explosive temper
  •        The process of isolating you from your family and friends
  •        Making false assumptions and accusations
  •        Wild mood swings and acting emotionally imbalanced
  •        Any physical abuse whatsoever
  •        Possessiveness and intimidation
  •        Telling you what to do, where to be, how to act, etc.

POTENTIAL ABUSER STRATEGIES TO BE AWARE OF

  •        They might use an Intrusion Test where the perpetrator subtly checks out your boundaries by physical proximity, comments or demands on your time and attention.
  •        They might use Desensitization Tactics.  You become accustomed to these intrusion tests, and no longer notice when your physical/social/emotional boundaries are crossed.
  •        They might use Isolation Tactic. The perpetrator isolates you, or waits for a situation where you’re isolated, to provide an opportunity for an assault/rape/attack.
  •        They may have frequent angry outbursts.  These outbursts are meant and intended to intimidate or control you.
  •        They ignore you or don’t believe you.  They keep testing and discounting your “NO.”
  •        They intrude or continue to intrude your personal space and are almost always too close or try inappropriate touching or other body contact.
  •        They frequently interrupt you and/or make intrusive or insensitive remarks, such as about your body, other women, etc.
  •        They use Forced Teaming which is making it seem like you have a mutual problem that you jointly have to resolve.
  •        They use Loan Sharking, which is doing you favors so you may feel like you owe him something or give him the benefit of the doubt.
  •        They use Typecasting which is calling you a name (snob/racist/lesbian, etc.) which they want you to try to disprove.  

 

laugh it up

Editor:  It’s true that children laugh many more times a day than adults do.  But, we should try to catch up to those little rascals!   And for greats reasons, it’s great for our health, not to mention our sanity!  So yuk it up, early and often.  And please share anything you find funny with us here: info@runhers.com  We are always looking for a good belly laugh! 

Laughter therapy

You know how it feels when you laugh so hard you cry? Whatever tension you had, a good belly laugh washes it away. Because your mind and body are connected, laughing may be one of the best natural medicines around.

What happens when you laugh?

A robust laugh gives the muscles of your face, diaphragm, abdomen, and sometimes your arms and legs, a good workout. Your heart rate and blood pressure rise then fall, you breathe faster and deeper, and oxygen surges through your blood stream. Your brain pumps hormones that make you very alert and endorphins that numb pain. Laughter:

  • raises your pain threshold
  • reduces stress and calms you in emotional situations
  • enhances immunity by boosting your levels of antibodies

Laughing relaxes your body and clears your mind. By seeing the humor in a stressful situation, you may be able to change your response to the stress by replacing negative thoughts with positive ones.

You can’t laugh and worry too much at the same time.

Prescription for laughter

How can you use humor to feel your best? Try to:

Seek out things that make you laugh, like funny movies, books, and cartoons

Keep a humor journal in which you write down jokes, funny things kids say, newspaper headlines, bumper stickers, and events

Tell jokes and make a point of passing on the jokes you hear

Laugh at yourself when you make mistakes or think you’re taking yourself too seriously

Look at the funny side of stressful situations and turn them into funny stories you can tell afterwards

Handle stressful events with humor instead of anger or anxiety

Humor can be a powerful medicine, and laughter can be contagious.

Source: Adapted with permission from the Healthy Mind, Healthy Body Handbook (as published under the title Mind & Body Health Handbook), David Sobel, MD, and Robert Ornstein, PhD, 1996

Reviewed by: Paul Millea, MD, June, 2013

 

one girl with courage is a revolution

Thank you so much for helping us bring the global movement to educate girls and change the world home to Oklahoma City with the sold out screening of the Girl Rising film.  Girl Rising spotlighted the stories of nine unforgettable girls born into unforgiving circumstances.  The hers projects/runhers, 10×10 and its partners are working to change minds, lives and policy.  Together we have the power to create equality for girls and change the world.  Our purpose here at runhers is to help as many women and girls as possible find their version of a healthy and happy life.

One girl with courage is a revolution.  We think all girls should be in an environment where they can dream a big dream, play safely with joy and develop a lifelong curiosity and love of learning.  The reality is that is only true for some.  We can send ripples of change with small actions – and we all can do something to connect more girls with opportunities to build the future they want.  Big change starts small.  The first step toward success is simple: pass it on. We know that educating girls will change the world.  The more people who share that message – through social networks, at the dinner table, in boardrooms, in rural villages – the more support we build.

All over the globe, violence and discrimination against women and girls violates their human rights and severely compromises girls’ health, education and the opportunity to build a better future.  Gender inequalities and biases pervade cultures worldwide, preventing women and girls from fully realizing their rights to reproductive health and equality.  We must do better.  If one girl with courage is a revolution – then what is hundreds of millions of women and girls moving with the mission of equality, safety and the freedom to choose the path they want to follow?  Each of us has the power to change this, one girl at a time.  Please consider donating some time or resources to the cause.

We are considering holding a summit regarding girls and the barriers to education/healthy living, along with possibly another screening of Girl Rising in OKC or with one of our other groups in Enid, Lawton or Tulsa.   If you or your organization is interested in partnering, please let us know.

We have also included some information and links for your reference.  Thank you again for supporting this important film screening.

10 Facts about Girls Education

Around the world, girls face barriers to education that boys do not.  But educating girls can break cycles of poverty in just one generation.  These statistics offer insights on those barriers and also illustrate the lasting impact education has on girls, families, communities and nations around the world.

  1.  66 million girls are out of school globally. (UNESCO)
  2. There are 33 million fewer girls than boys in primary school.(Education First)
  3. A child born to a literate mother is 50% more likely to survive past the age of 5. (UNESCO)
  4. Educated mothers are more than twice as likely to send theirchildren to school. (UNICEF)
  5. In a single year, an estimated 150 million girls are victims of sexual violence. (UNIFEM) [50% of sexual assaults in the world victimize girls under the age of 15 (UNFPA).]
  6. 14 million girls under 18 will be married this year. That’s 38 thousand today – or 13 girls in the last 30 seconds. (UNFPA)
  7. The #1 cause of death for girls 15-19 is childbirth. (World HealthOrganization)
  8. Girls with 8 years of education are 4 times less likely to be married as children. (National Academies Press)
  9. A girl with an extra year of education can earn 20% more as an adult.(The World Bank)
  10. If India enrolled 1% more girls in secondary school, their GDP would rise by $5.5 billion. (CIA World Factbook) (Global Campaign for Education and RESULTS Education Fund)

The Importance of Education locally (Oklahoma)

Currently, Oklahoma is ranked the 2nd worst state in the nation for women and girls, based on a number of factors including access to education, access to healthcare, domestic violence, female incarceration, human trafficking, and more.  Food insecurity is another issue that plays significantly into the education system.  An incredible amount of imagination and new designs will be necessary to significantly impact how our children grow up in the state of Oklahoma.  Many organizations will be needed to work in the estuary region where many children do not get the support they really need.  A new model of collaboration is needed, and a real sense of urgency needs to be adopted.

Here is a report of “Overall Child Well Being in Oklahoma” compiled by oica.org

http://oica.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/OICA-2012-Oklahoma-KIDS-COUNT-Data.pdf

Please take a minute to learn more about the film, the film makers and the cause.

Girl Rising Links and FAQ’s:

 

 

slow cooker tuesday – homemade applesauce


I love trying to find new things to snack on that are healthy and low in fat and calories. I also like to find recipes that are versatile so you can tweak them, and make them your own. Today I am bringing homemade applesauce to the table. Since it is Tuesday, it would not be right if it was not made in the slow cooker!

Cinnamon Applesauce
The Best of Prevention Slow Cooker Recipes
 
7 apples (try McIntosh), peeled, cored, and chopped
2 tsp ground cinnamon
3/4 cup water
1/2 cup brown sugar
 
Place apples in 4-qt or larger slow cooker and sprinkle with cinnamon. Add water. Cover. Cook on low 2 to 4 hours, or until apples become mushy. Stir in brown sugar and mix well.

Servings: 6. Per serving: 143 cal, 0 g pro, 38 g carb, 2 g fiber, 0 g fat, 0 g sat fat, 0 mg chol, 8 mg sodium

Play around with different spice combinations. Try some nutmeg and clove, or if you want to get extreme even some cayenne pepper. Different kinds of apples will bring different flavors. Granny Smith apples make a great applesauce too!

I hope you enjoy this healthy, tasty treat!

Live. Life. Beautifully.

Staci Patton